Stephen Gordon

Stephen Gordon

Stephen Gordon is an economics professor at l'Université Laval in Quebec City. He started the blog Worthwhile Canadian Initiative in 2005 and has been blogging about economics ever since.
A view of employees working at the General Motors assembly plant in Wentzville, Missouri February 7, 2012. When the U.S. automaker wanted to assign the launch of the next version of their full-sized pickup trucks and SUVs, they turned to one of the toughest executives in its ranks. The 5-foot-2 Diana Tremblay, GM's global manufacturing chief, is one of the highest ranking women in the automotive industry and has upended expectations her entire 35-year career, from directing workers in GM's foundries to staring down union labor negotiator.  Picture taken February 7, 2012. To match Feature GM-TRUCKS/ REUTERS/Sarah Conard (UNITED STATES - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS)
Business

Shocking idea about the Jobs Grants program: Give the money to trainees

Workers will use it better than either the provinces or employers
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Business

What’s happening to middle class incomes?

The news isn’t bad. The real issue is men’s wages.
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Business

Has Ben Bernanke made Stephen Poloz’s job more difficult?

The Federal Reserve chairman and the Canadian dollar
Why Canada is no slouch
Business

Why Canada is no slouch

Stephen Gordon explains why the oft-repeated claim that we are a productivity laggard is all wrong
doctors-financialincentives rotator
Business

Canada’s productivity crisis: misdiagnosed

An Econowatch special report on productivity (part five)
Oil Sands in Alberta
Business

Don’t blame Canada’s productivity woes on the commodity boom

An Econowatch special report on productivity (part four)
MAGIC TRICK f
Business

A Canadian magic trick: wages that rise even if productivity doesn’t

An Econowatch special report on productivity (part three)
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Business

Technical progress in Canada’s business sector: stuck in 1971?

An Econowatch special report on productivity (part two)
A view of employees working at the General Motors assembly plant in Wentzville, Missouri February 7, 2012. When the U.S. automaker wanted to assign the launch of the next version of their full-sized pickup trucks and SUVs, they turned to one of the toughest executives in its ranks. The 5-foot-2 Diana Tremblay, GM's global manufacturing chief, is one of the highest ranking women in the automotive industry and has upended expectations her entire 35-year career, from directing workers in GM's foundries to staring down union labor negotiator.  Picture taken February 7, 2012. To match Feature GM-TRUCKS/ REUTERS/Sarah Conard (UNITED STATES - Tags: TRANSPORT BUSINESS)
Business

Intro to productivity (that thing Canadians are apparently so bad at)

Presenting: the Econowatch special report on productivity